Knit Me A Pony: Status Message Here

I tell stories.
~ Friday, September 23 ~
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Why are left-wing activist groups so keen on registering the poor to vote?
Because they know the poor can be counted on to vote themselves more benefits by electing redistributionist politicians. Welfare recipients are particularly open to demagoguery and bribery.


Registering them to vote is like handing out burglary tools to criminals. It is profoundly antisocial and un-American to empower the nonproductive segments of the population to destroy the country — which is precisely why Barack Obama zealously supports registering welfare recipients to vote.

Matthew Vadum thinks registering the poor to vote is un-American. (via pantslessprogressive)

Wow! So poor people are unproductive criminals and anti-social enemies of the state. Got it.

(via tjjourian)

Srsly?

(via dontcallmevinny)

How about we register the poor to vote because they are so disenfranchised that they are less likely to be included the the processes of the system the govern’s their lives?

Tags: presented without comment GOP Voting
118 notes
reblogged via civicbooty
~ Friday, September 16 ~
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blocky-sheep:

madamethursday:

[Image: Macros of four Republican politicians with captions. The picture of Michelle Bachmann has the caption: “Says Medicare contributes to “welfare rolls”. Husband collects $137K in medicare payments.” The next is of Rick Perry with the caption: “Protects Life. Proud to Preside over 234 Executions.” The next is of Mitt Romney: “I’m also unemployed. Plans to quadruple size of $12 mil. mansion.” The last is of Jon Huntsman: “The Moderate Candidate. Won’t support $10 in spending cuts for $1 in tax hikes.”]

I stand by my assertion. The Republican Party has become the Mos Eisley of politics. Never will you find a more wretched hive of scum and villainy. And I say this knowing that DNC isn’t all that much better, but damn. At least they’re not trying to take away (most) of my rights. 

I still say that most of this is theater to yank the Republican base’s idea of “moderate” further to the right so that they can get a reactionary candidate in under the guise of being moderate.

(Source: pantslessprogressive)

Tags: 2012 GOP All the clowns under the big tent
2,908 notes
reblogged via blocky-sheep-deactivated2011102
~ Wednesday, September 7 ~
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whiporwill:

gayhomophobe.com

I wish this didn’t use the ablest -phobic construction, because it’s kind of lovely and stark.

whiporwill:

gayhomophobe.com

I wish this didn’t use the ablest -phobic construction, because it’s kind of lovely and stark.

Tags: hypocrisy LGBT GOP politics
43 notes
reblogged via whipporwill-deactivated20111220
~ Monday, September 5 ~
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Let’s get it over with and rename the holiday “Capital Day.” We may still celebrate Labor Day, but our culture has given up on honoring workers as the real creators of wealth and their honest toil — the phrase itself seems antique — as worthy of genuine respect.

Imagine a Republican saying this: “Labor is prior to and independent of capital. Capital is only the fruit of labor, and could never have existed if labor had not first existed. Labor is the superior of capital, and deserves much the higher consideration.”

These heretical thoughts would inspire horror among our friends at Fox News or in the Tea Party. They’d likely label them as Marxist, socialist or Big Labor propaganda. Too bad for Abraham Lincoln, our first Republican president, who offered those words in his annual message to Congress in 1861. Will President Obama dare say anything like this in his jobs speech this week?
Tags: GOP Labor Day corporatocracy labor politics
31 notes
reblogged via ethiopienne
~ Sunday, September 4 ~
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…All told, a dozen states have approved new obstacles to voting. Kansas and Alabama now require would-be voters to provide proof of citizenship before registering. Florida and Texas made it harder for groups like the League of Women Voters to register new voters. Maine repealed Election Day voter registration, which had been on the books since 1973. Five states – Florida, Georgia, Ohio, Tennessee and West Virginia – cut short their early voting periods. Florida and Iowa barred all ex-felons from the polls, disenfranchising thousands of previously eligible voters. And six states controlled by Republican governors and legislatures – Alabama, Kansas, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas and Wisconsin – will require voters to produce a government-issued ID before casting ballots. More than 10 percent of U.S. citizens lack such identification, and the numbers are even higher among constituencies that traditionally lean Democratic – including 18 percent of young voters and 25 percent of African-Americans.’
Tags: Voting voter disenfranchisement GOP Koch Brothers is this what it's come to?
327 notes
reblogged via ethiopienne
~ Thursday, August 25 ~
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pantslessprogressive:

In 2003, Texas Governor and current GOP presidential hopeful Rick Perry was the driving force behind an insurance scheme to bet on the deaths of retired teachers while Wall Street turned a profit, according to information obtained by The Huffington Post.
According to Zach Carter and Jason Cherkis at HuffPo, Governor Perry and his office tried to convince retired teachers to accept a life insurance plan that would ultimately provide benefits to Wall Street and the state of Texas, rather than family members of the deceased.

According to the notes, which were authenticated by a meeting participant, the Perry administration wanted to help Wall Street investors gamble on how long retired Texas teachers would live. Perry was promising the state big money in exchange for helping Swiss banking giant UBS set up a business of teacher death speculation.
All they had to do was convince retirees to let UBS buy life insurance policies on them. When the retirees died, those policies would pay out benefits to Wall Street speculators, and the state, supposedly, would get paid for arranging the bets. The families of the deceased former teachers would get nothing.
The meeting notes offer the most direct evidence that the Perry administration was not only intimately involved with the insurance scheme, but a leading driver of the plan.
[…] The notes make clear that the governor’s proposal deliberately targeted the elderly. The state was only seeking to take out life insurance on people between the ages of 75 and 90. At a separate meeting five days later, the plan’s proponents discussed the “mental capacity” of these retirees to grant consent as one of three major technical obstacles to the plan, according to notes from that meeting.

At the first meeting, Morrissey said it could take 10 to 12 years for Texas to “earn” money from the scheme, but insisted the deal could be worth up to $700 million for the state if the retirement fund could sign up 40,000 retired teachers.

Perry and team even used a financial incentive to pitch this scheme, according to a meeting attendee:

The governor’s office was even prepared to put down a little cash up front. If retirees balked at the notion of the state profiting from their deaths, Perry’s budget men suggested they could be persuaded for the cost of a pair of shoes, according to the meeting notes. If a retiree signed a contract allowing the state’s teacher pension fund to buy life insurance on them, the governor was prepared to give them between $50 and $100.

The life insurance plan never happened and Perry’s office has since attempted to distance itself from the idea. However, as the article points out, the governor’s office “had not only endorsed the concept, but had already formulated a plan to implement it,” according to the meeting notes.
Read the full story at HuffPo.

SUPER CLASSY.

pantslessprogressive:

In 2003, Texas Governor and current GOP presidential hopeful Rick Perry was the driving force behind an insurance scheme to bet on the deaths of retired teachers while Wall Street turned a profit, according to information obtained by The Huffington Post.

According to Zach Carter and Jason Cherkis at HuffPo, Governor Perry and his office tried to convince retired teachers to accept a life insurance plan that would ultimately provide benefits to Wall Street and the state of Texas, rather than family members of the deceased.

According to the notes, which were authenticated by a meeting participant, the Perry administration wanted to help Wall Street investors gamble on how long retired Texas teachers would live. Perry was promising the state big money in exchange for helping Swiss banking giant UBS set up a business of teacher death speculation.

All they had to do was convince retirees to let UBS buy life insurance policies on them. When the retirees died, those policies would pay out benefits to Wall Street speculators, and the state, supposedly, would get paid for arranging the bets. The families of the deceased former teachers would get nothing.

The meeting notes offer the most direct evidence that the Perry administration was not only intimately involved with the insurance scheme, but a leading driver of the plan.

[…] The notes make clear that the governor’s proposal deliberately targeted the elderly. The state was only seeking to take out life insurance on people between the ages of 75 and 90. At a separate meeting five days later, the plan’s proponents discussed the “mental capacity” of these retirees to grant consent as one of three major technical obstacles to the plan, according to notes from that meeting.

At the first meeting, Morrissey said it could take 10 to 12 years for Texas to “earn” money from the scheme, but insisted the deal could be worth up to $700 million for the state if the retirement fund could sign up 40,000 retired teachers.

Perry and team even used a financial incentive to pitch this scheme, according to a meeting attendee:

The governor’s office was even prepared to put down a little cash up front. If retirees balked at the notion of the state profiting from their deaths, Perry’s budget men suggested they could be persuaded for the cost of a pair of shoes, according to the meeting notes. If a retiree signed a contract allowing the state’s teacher pension fund to buy life insurance on them, the governor was prepared to give them between $50 and $100.

The life insurance plan never happened and Perry’s office has since attempted to distance itself from the idea. However, as the article points out, the governor’s office “had not only endorsed the concept, but had already formulated a plan to implement it,” according to the meeting notes.

Read the full story at HuffPo.

SUPER CLASSY.

Tags: Rick Perry GOP 2012 Texas Life Insurance Teachers Cronyism UBS Wall Street
100 notes
reblogged via soidreamtiwasastarfleetcommander
~ Sunday, August 21 ~
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Tags: politics GOP
104 notes
reblogged via whipporwill-deactivated20111220